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Bloody Sunday pyscho child killers sent to join the SAS

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Sceala Irish Craic Forum Discussion:     Bloody Sunday pyscho child killers sent to join the SAS

The British Queen honored and knighted those in charge of these deranged killers.
I apologise for dismissing out of hand the comparison claims here. I did not know the full story at the time. I now accept that the comparisons between Dunblane - Hungerford - Cumbria - Derry are fair and proper to make, and the central conclusion as absolute fact.

Adding this witness evidence to give further proof of just how accurate the posting here was. And the comparison between other scenes of mass murder both here in England and in Scotland, prophetic to say the least.
Dunblane - Hungerford - Cumbria - Derry

The scenes of mass murder of innocents do have so much in common, one exceptional difference being the British Queen approved of mass murder of the Irish.
Queen Elizabeth || decorated the killers of innocent Irish people.

Bloody Sunday pyscho killers of Irish children were sent to join the SAS
Bloody Sunday soldier's horror at killings
A former paratrooper yesterday claimed his comrades carried out "unspeakable acts" with "no justification" when they shot dead 13 unarmed boys and men 30 years ago on Bloody Sunday.

Identified only as Soldier 027, he took the witness stand yesterday at Methodist Central Hall, Westminster, where he gave his testimony, hidden from view behind a curtain, just a few feet away from 20 of those injured and bereaved in the aftermath of a civil rights march.

Soldier 027, a 19-year-old radio operator with 1 Para on Bloody Sunday, was the first soldier who witnessed events in the Bogside to appear at the inquiry. He did not fire his weapon that day but stood beside other soldiers who did.

In a soft, halting, well-spoken voice, he replied to many of the questions that he could no longer remember the details. But in his written statement, he painted a vivid picture of the excited, adrenalin-pumped Paras, the terrified crowd, none of whom was armed as far as he could see, the blood and the bodies falling on the ground.

He believed two soldiers in particular were responsible for triggering the shooting, and that between them they killed eight or 10 people. He did not see any civilians with guns or bombs and said there was no justification for a single shot he saw any soldier fire. But he claimed statements he gave to Royal Military Police and a lawyer for Lord Widgery's 1972 tribunal were altered to show the army in a more favourable light. 027 was not called to give oral evidence to Widgery, who exonerated the soldiers and cast aspersions on the dead.

The Ministry of Defence won its legal battle for about 300 soldiers to testify in London because they thought their lives would be under threat from terrorists if they returned to Derry, where the inquiry has been sitting for the past two years. But 027, who left the army in 1974, is in a the north of Ireland Office witness protection scheme due to the risk to his safety from his former colleagues, who will give dramatically different accounts when they testify, saying they came under fire from gunmen and bombers on Bloody Sunday.

While most of the soldiers are anonymous, only two others will also be screened, but for different reasons from 027.

The soldier's graphic account of the terrible carnage he alleged he saw his colleagues inflict in the Bogside on January 30 1972, only came to light after he wrote an anonymous letter to a Belfast newspaper on the 25th anniversary of the killings.

Military commanders and other soldiers hotly contested his version but it was pivotal in persuading Tony Blair to order a fresh investigation into one of the most emotive events in the history of the north of Ireland.

In his statement, 027 described the pride and loyalty he felt when he joined the Parachute regiment at 19 in 1971, and the surreal and violent atmosphere he found in his first posting to Belfast.
"There was an element of enjoying the violence of the situation," he admitted. "We were all, to various degrees, brutalised by it." He had very little understanding of the political situation, but was well versed in the fear and tension felt by the young soldiers. He told of the casual brutality among members of 1 Para, whom he described as the army's "Rottweiler", taking out pent-up frustrations on anyone who happened to cross their path.

He said the night before he and his comrades went to Derry to police the civil rights march, he attended an informal briefing where there was talk of "getting kills". The soldiers were convinced they were about to face IRA gunmen and there was a gung-ho atmosphere as the order came to move in.

He told of his horror and confusion when Lance Corporal F kneeled in front of him and opened fire on the crowd, and as other soldiers joined in.

"Two people towards the centre of the barricade fell within seconds of each other in the opening burst of fire," he said. "I did not see anyone with a weapon or see or hear an explosive device. I have a clear memory of consciously thinking 'what are they firing at?' and feeling some inadequacy. What was I not seeing that I ought to be seeing."

He described the excitement of the soldiers who did fire.
"One chap, a full corporal whose name I cannot recall, ran up beside me pushing between two other soldiers who were firing, so that he could commence firing himself. He indicated to me that he thought what was happening was great. He was exuberant.
"I had the distinct impression that this was a case of some soldiers realising this was an opportunity to fire their weapon and they didn't want to miss the chance. The level of shooting grew as more soldiers arrived."

He said two soldiers in particular - Lance Corporal F, who will give evidence to the inquiry, and Soldier G, who has since died, seemed to be operating together to a preconceived plan.

"I have always been satisfied in my own mind that Lance Corporal F and Soldier G probably shot eight or 10 people that day," he said. "I thought it was their aggressive, positive actions which incited a few other loonies to join in."

He had a vague recollection of Lieutenant Colonel Derek Wilford, the commander on the ground that day, saying afterwards that the two soldiers would be better packed off to the SAS, and they were sent for SAS training when they returned to England.

Afterwards soldiers discussed how they would "cover their arses" as the official army view that troops had come under terrorist fire took hold.
He gave a statement to a lawyer from the Widgery tribunal, determined to tell the truth without "dropping people directly in it".

But when he described the shooting, the lawyer said: "We can't have that, can we, private?" and took his statement out of the room where it was changed.

He claimed another statement he had earlier given to the Royal Military Police was also fabricated to suggest he saw a sniper and heard shots from terrorists.

On the 25th anniversary he wrestled with conflicting feelings of loyalty to his former unit and the desire to tell the truth before sending an anonymous letter to a Belfast paper and then agreeing to appear unidentified on Channel 4 News. "Unspeakable acts took place on Bloody Sunday. There was no justification for a single shot I saw fired," he said.
guardian.co.uk/uk/2002/oct/17/bloodysunday.northernireland


I never really understood the SAS significance! Here in England all we are fed is a diet of how brave the SAS are.
We are never told they might be pyschopaths or murderers and child killers.

As Rory said, we would not know here in England what goes on, because the BBC never go into detail about the 'shootings' when the British are doing the killing.

Never even knew about this event for instance

SAS murder young completely innocent young Irish man with special needs

No shock in this account either
The Ministry of Defence has blocked the publication of new evidence which is set to reignite the controversy surrounding "non-judicial executions" of terror suspects by British forces in the north of Ireland.
Army censors have suppressed a statement compiled by an Army intelligence officer which describes in graphic detail an SAS action which led to the killing of three IRA suspects in 1991.
The statement was due to be published today in a new history of the SAS and other special forces units, but was withdrawn following a meeting between ministry officials and the publishers.
The book makes a vitriolic attack on Sir Peter de la Billiere, the commander of British forces in the Gulf War and the former director of the SAS, who is accused of misrepresenting the actions of the elite regiment in the north of Ireland in his own book.
The Independent has obtained an account, compiled by an operative with 14th Intelligence, an undercover army unit that works closely with the SAS.
The account describes an SAS operation designed to pre-empt a sectarian IRA attack at Coagh, in County Tyrone in June 1991. It claims that the terrorists were allowed to arm themselves and drive, under surveillance, to the village before being killed in a hail of bullets.
It has been suggested that there was no prospect of making an arrest. The so-called "yellow-card" rules say that security forces personnel should always give a warning unless "to do so would increase the risk of death or grave injury to you or any other person", or they are actually already under fire. In practice, this means that when the weapons are out, the security forces start shooting.
In the original version of the new book, Secret Warfare: Special Operations Forces from the Great Game to the SAS, the author Adrian Weale, said: "If there had been a real intention of arresting the Coagh terrorists it could and should have been done whilst their vehicle was under surveillance en route to Coagh."
In the event, the SAS used a disguised lorry to ambush the terrorists as they arrived in Coagh. Around 200 shots were fired into their stolen Vauxhall Cavalier and it burst into flames. The terrorists Tony Doris, Peter Ryan and Laurence McNally were burnt beyond recognition. The IRA later admitted that the men were members and were "on active service".
The account is in no way critical of the actions of colleagues and describes the ambush as a "classic result".
But Mr Weale, himself a former army intelligence officer who is now a respected military historian, and representatives of his publisher Hodder & Stoughton, were brought before an MoD committee, where the changes were demanded.
The MoD would not comment on the matter but it is thought that ministry officials believed the intelligence officer had overstated the amount of information which the SAS had prior to the ambush.
There may also be concerns that, despite the passage of more than six years, the inquests into the three deaths have still not been heard or even listed.
At the time of the killings, nationalist politicians had expressed their hope that every effort had been made to arrest the men.
Last night, Francie Molloy, a Sinn Fein councillor who knew the three dead men, said: "This shows there were enough troops on the ground to have secured the arrest of the occupants of the car without anyone being shot.
"Instead it was a case of judge, jury and executioner all in one operation."
But the MoD censors have allowed the book to carry its attack on General de la Billiere for his description of SAS activities in the north of Ireland in his 1994 autobiography, Looking for Trouble.
In particular, the general's account of the killing of a young Catholic farmer's son, is denounced as a "grotesque misrepresentation of what actually took place". John Boyle, 16, was mistakenly shot dead by two SAS men who were staking out a terrorist arms cache at a cemetery in Dunloy, Co Antrim, in 1978.
Drawing on subsequent court evidence, Mr Weale reports that the youth had earlier found the weapons and alerted the security services. But he could not resist returning to the site the following day.
In his description of the shooting, General de la Billiere claims it took place at night following a stakeout lasting several days after troops had uncovered the cache themselves. He says of the victim: "Clearly the dead man had been a member of the IRA; but he was only 16, and probably a low-grade operator."
Mr Weale writes: "Almost every detail of this version of events is false: the weapons were not originally discovered by soldiers but by Boyle himself; the stakeout had lasted for less than 24 hours; the shooting happened in broad daylight at 10am; and the victim was not and never had been a member of the IRA."

archive.today/yNFhH

The British army under approval of Westminster powers, always covered up or dilute the accounts of when they (British army) are behaving like the Terrorists they claim to be fighting! The British Government and their Queen as sovereign in overall command of army, not only lied, they decorated liars.

There is no question that the British army caused a lot of the problems in Ireland. They encouraged sectarianism and racism when they targeted specifically one side, the Irish!

So it is not just truth but a fact.
The comparison between other scenes of mass murder both here in England and in Scotland, prophetic to say the least.
Dunblane - Hungerford - Cumbria - Derry
are logical.
The scenes of mass murder of innocents do have so much in common, one exceptional difference being the British Queen approved of mass murder of the Irish.
Queen Elizabeth || decorated the killers of innocent Irish people.

Bloody sunday pyscho british army murderers are still walking free.
These cowardly evil thug murderers will pay one day in hells fires.

The following is a second draft (v2) of accounts of the circumstances in which those who were killed on 'Bloody Sunday' were shot. The information contained in this page is derived from a number of sources, see recommended reading and other sources.



Introduction

According to British Army evidence 21 soldiers fired their weapons on 'Bloody Sunday' and shot 108 rounds between them. Two soldiers were responsible for firing a total 35 bullets. Soldier F fired 13 shots and Soldier H fired 22 shots and both soldiers were in the area of Glenfada Park at the time of the shooting.

The fatal shooting on 'Bloody Sunday' began at approximately 4.10pm when soldiers entered the Rossville Street area of the Bogside. However, before the fatal shooting began two people were shot and wounded in William Street at about 3.55pm. The two people were Damien Donaghey (15) and John Johnson (59). The soldiers involved, Soldier A and B, claimed that they had come under attack from nailbombs. No other witnesses, civilian or military heard any nailbombs explode at 3.55pm. Johnson was shot twice in the incident and died on 16 June 1972. His family is convinced that he died prematurely and that his death was due to the injuries received and trauma he underwent on 'Bloody Sunday'.

Most of those shot dead on 'Bloody Sunday' were killed in four main areas: the car park (courtyard) of Rossville Flats; the forecourt of Rossville Flats (between the Flats and Joseph Place); at the rubble and wire barricade on Rossville Street (between Rossville Flats and Glenfada Park); and in the area around Glenfada Park (between Glenfada Park and Abbey Park). The following accounts look at the shootings in each of these areas in turn. It is not possible to give the exact time of any particular shooting or the exact order in which all 13 people were shot dead. However, within the above four main areas the sequence of fatal shooting can be established from the available evidence.



The car park (courtyard) of Rossville Flats

As soldiers of the Parachute Regiment entered the Bogside a number of their Humber Armoured Vehicles ('Pigs') drove into the car park (courtyard) of Rossville Flats. Alana Burke ( 18 ) and Patrick Campbell (53) were run down by two different Army vehicles as they fled across the car park. In addition to Jack Duddy (17), who was shot dead in the car park, four people were wounded by shooting: Margaret Deery (37; the only woman shot and injured on 'Bloody Sunday'), Michael Bridge (25), Michael Bradley (22) and Patrick McDaid (24).

John 'Jack' Duddy (17)
Jack Duddy was killed by a single shot that passed through his upper chest from right to left and slightly forward. Four witnesses, Edward Daly, then a Catholic priest, Mrs Bonner, Mrs Duffy and Mr Tucker, all stated that Duddy was unarmed at the time he was shot and that he was running away from soldiers when he was shot. Three of these witness stated that they saw a soldier take deliberate aim at Duddy as he fled across the courtyard of Rossville Flats. Jack Duddy was probably the first person to be shot dead on 'Bloody Sunday'.
Lord Widgery concluded that he was hit by a bullet meant for someone else.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.47 In our view Private R of Mortar Platoon was probably the soldier who aimed at and shot Jackie Duddy." and "3.94 Jackie Duddy was running away from the soldiers when he was shot. He probably had a stone in his hand at the time. Private R may have thought that Jackie Duddy might have been about to throw a bomb and shot him for this reason, but we are sure that he could not have been sufficiently confident about this to conclude that he was justified in firing." BSI/V1/C3



The forecourt of Rossville Flats

As the shooting intensified a group of people became caught in the area between Rosville Flats and the maisonnettes of Joseph Place. Pat Doherty (31) was among them and was shot as he tried to crawl to safety. Barney McGuigan (41) heard the calls of Doherty and left the relative safety of the side of Rosville Flats to go to his aid but McGuigan was shot dead within a couple of paces of where he had been. Two other people were shot and wounded in this area, Daniel McGowan (37) and Patrick Campbell (53).

Patrick 'Pat' Doherty (31)
Patrick Doherty was shot from behind while trying to crawl to safety in the vicinity of the forecourt of Rossville Flats, between the Flats and Joseph Place. He was shot once and died at the scene. The bullet entered his right buttock and travelled forward and upward through his body before exiting from the left of his chest. Patrick Doherty was photographed by Gilles Peress moments before he died. The photographs showed that he was not armed.
Lord Widgery concluded that he had probably been shot by Soldier F (who was in Glenfada Park at the time) who claimed that Patrick Doherty had a pistol in his hand.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.65 ... We are sure that Lance Corporal F fired at and shot Bernard McGuigan and Patrick Doherty and it is highly probable that he was also responsible for shooting the other two casualties." BSI/V1/C3

Bernard 'Barney' McGuigan (41)
Barney McGuigan was going to the aid of Patrick Doherty and was signalling with a white handkerchief held in his hand when he was shot dead by a single bullet through the back of his head. The bullet entered close to his left ear and exited through his right eye travelling forward and upward through his skull. He died where he fell near the corner of Rossville Flats between Rossville Street and Joseph Place. A number of eyewitnesses stated that he was unarmed.
Lead particles were found on both his hands which drew Lord Widgery to conclude that: "he had been in close proximity to someone who had fired" (Widgery Report, Paragraph 74). This finding ignored the possibility of contamination from a number of other sources.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.65 ... We are sure that Lance Corporal F fired at and shot Bernard McGuigan and Patrick Doherty and it is highly probable that he was also responsible for shooting the other two casualties." and "3.112 ... Bernard McGuigan was shot in the head and killed instantly as he was waving a piece of cloth and moving out from the cover afforded by the southern end wall of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats." and "3.113 We have no doubt that Lance Corporal F shot Patrick Doherty and Bernard McGuigan, and it is highly probable that he also shot Patrick Campbell and Daniel McGowan. In 1972 Lance Corporal F initially said nothing about firing along the pedestrianised area on the southern side of Block 2 of the Rossville Flats, but later admitted that he had done so. No other soldier claimed or admitted to firing into this area. Lance Corporal F’s claim that he had fired at a man who had (or, in one account, was firing) a pistol was to his knowledge false. Lance Corporal F did not fire in a state of fear or panic. We are sure that he fired either in the belief that no-one in the area into which he fired was posing a threat of causing death or serious injury, or not caring whether or not anyone there was posing such a threat." BSI/V1/C3




The rubble and wire barricade on Rossville Street

Six men between the ages of 17 and 20 years were shot and killed at or near the rubble barricade which lay across Rossville Street, close to the main entrance to Rossville Flats. The men were: Hugh Gilmour (17); Kevin McElhinney (17); Michael Kelly (17); John Young (17); William Nash (19); and Michael McDaid (20). In addition to those killed at the barricade Alexander 'Alex' Nash (52) was shot and wounded. Alexander had seen the body of his son William Nash lying on the rubble barricade and had run to his side.

Hugh Gilmour (17)
Hugh Gilmour was shot by a single bullet that passed through his body and through his left forearm as he was running away from soldiers in Rossville Street. The bullet travelled from right to left through his chest travelling horizontally and slightly forward. A photograph of Gilmour, taken seconds after he was hit, showed that he was unarmed a fact confirmed by a number of witnesses. Gilmour was shot close to the rubble barricade but managed to run for several meters before falling to the ground at the side of Rossville Flats. A student nurse tried to treat his wounds. He died shortly after where he had fallen.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.57 We are sure that Private U, a member of Mortar Platoon who had taken up a position at the northern end of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats, fired at and mortally wounded Hugh Gilmour as the latter was running south (ie away from the soldiers) along the Rossville Street side of Block 1 of the Rossville Flats." and "3.103 We take the same view of the shot that we are sure Private U fired at Hugh Gilmour, mortally wounding this casualty as he was running away from the soldiers. We reject as knowingly untrue Private U’s account of firing at a man with a handgun." BSI/V1/C3


Kevin McElhinney (17)
Kevin McElhinney was shot from behind, probably by Soldier K, as he was attempting to crawl to safety in the Rossville Flats. The bullet entered his left buttock and travelled up through his body exiting near his shoulder. Two eyewitnesses, including a Catholic priest, testified that McElhinney was unarmed. He was shot close to the front entrance of Rossville Flats, near to the rubble barricade, and was dragged inside by some people who were already sheltering there. He died almost immediately.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.58 We are sure that either Private L or Private M, members of Composite Platoon who had taken up positions at the low walls of the Kells Walk ramp, shot Kevin McElhinney as he was crawling south from the rubble barricade away from the soldiers. Both probably fired at him on the orders of one or perhaps two nearby non-commissioned officers, Colour Sergeant 002 and Corporal 039." BSI/V1/C3

Michael Kelly (17)
Michael Kelly died from a single shot to his abdomen, probably fired by Soldier F. The bullet entered from the front and travelled backward and downward. He died within a few minutes of being shot. He was shot near the rubble barricade in front of Rossville Flats.
Lord Widgery accepted that Kelly was not armed but concluded that he must have been standing close to someone who had discharged their weapon because of lead particles on Kelly's right cuff. This finding ignored the strong likelihood of contamination from soldiers who handled the bodies when they were taken to the morgue (this was true in the case of many of those killed).
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.55 We are sure that shortly after he disembarked from his vehicle and while events were unfolding in the car park of the Rossville Flats, Lance Corporal F of Anti-Tank Platoon fired from the low walls of the Kells Walk ramp and mortally injured Michael Kelly, who was behind the rubble barricade in Rossville Street." and "3.101 In Rossville Street, Lance Corporal F fired from the low walls of the Kells Walk ramp and killed Michael Kelly who was behind the rubble barricade on Rossville Street, some 80 yards away. Initially Lance Corporal F said nothing about this shot but later he admitted that he had fired, falsely claiming that this was at a nail bomber. In our view Lance Corporal F did not fire in panic or fear, without giving proper thought to whether he had identified a person posing a threat of causing death or serious injury. We are sure that instead he fired either in the belief that no-one at the rubble barricade was posing a threat of causing death or serious injury, or not caring whether or not anyone at the rubble barricade was posing such a threat." BSI/V1/C3

John Young (17)
John Young was killed by a single shot to the head at the rubble barricade on Rossville Street. The bullet entered close to his left eye and travelled backward and downward before exiting through his ribs on the left side of his back. Two eyewitnesses gave evidence to the Widgery tribunal that Young was unarmed when he was shot.
Lead particles were found on his left hand and Lord Widgery concluded that he had probably fired a gun. This conclusion ignored the evidence given by the forensic expert, Dr John Martin, that a body could be contaminated by being handled by someone who had fired a weapon, or by contact with the floor of an Army vehicle, or by being close to someone who had fired a weapon.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.102 As to the further shooting in Rossville Street, which caused the deaths of William Nash, John Young and Michael McDaid, Corporal P claimed that he fired at a man with a pistol; Lance Corporal J claimed that he fired at a nail bomber; and Corporal E claimed that he fired at a man with a pistol in the Rossville Flats. We reject each of these claims as knowingly untrue. We are sure that these soldiers fired either in the belief that no-one in the areas towards which they respectively fired was posing a threat of causing death or serious injury, or not caring whether or not anyone there was posing such a threat. In their cases we consider that they did not fire in a state of fear or panic." BSI/V1/C3

William Nash (19)
William Nash was killed by a single shot to his chest near the rubble barricade in front of Rossville Flats. The bullet entered his right upper chest from the front and travelled backward and downward exiting from his lower back. He was possibly shot by Soldier P. He was killed at almost the same time and in the same circumstances as John Young. Eyewitness accounts state that Nash was unarmed and was going to the aid of someone else when he himself was shot.
However, because lead particles were found on his left hand Lord Widgery concluded that he had probably been firing a gun.
For Saville's finding see entry above for John Young.

Michael McDaid (20)
Michael McDaid was killed by a single shot to his face at the rubble barricade in front of Rossville Flats. He probably died immediately he had been shot. As in the case of Michael Kelly, lead particles were found on McDaid's jacket and his right hand.
Lord Widgery concluded that he was near to someone discharging a weapon and ignored the possibility of contamination from the soldiers or their vehicles.
For Saville's finding see entry above for John Young.
A book Eyewitness Bloody Sunday: The Truth included a photograph of McDaid moments before he was shot. This photograph shows McDaid walking away from the soldiers and facing towards 'Free Derry Corner'. This evidence, plus the results of post-mortem examinations, which showed the trajectory of the bullet to be from the front to the back and from above to below, plus recent evidence that soldiers on the Derry Walls fired into the bogside, has led the author of the book to conclude that McDaid, Nash and Young could have been shot by one or more soldiers who were on the Derry Walls.



Glenfada Park

Following the beginning of the intensive shooting on Rossville Street many people sought shelter in the courtyard of Glenfada Park. However, at least four soldiers (Soldiers E, F, G and H) entered the area and began firing on people sheltering there. Soldier E fired 3 shots; Soldier F fired 13 shots; Soldier H fired 22 shots; and Soldier G fired 6 shots. Soldier H claimed that he saw a man with a weapon at a window of one of the flats in Glenfada Park and fired and missed. The man reappeared and Soldier H fired and missed again. According to Soldier H this sequence of events was repeated 19 times. Lord Widgery accepted photographic evidence which showed that there were no bullet holes in the window, walls or roof of the house in question. Four men were shot dead at Glenfada Park, they were: James Wray (22); Gerald Donaghey (17); Gerald McKinney (35); and William McKinney (26). In addition a number of people were shot and wounded: Joseph 'Joe' Friel (20); Michael Quinn (17); Daniel Gillespie (31); Paddy O'Donnell (41); and Joseph Mahon (16).

James Wray (22)
James Wray was shot dead in Glenfada Park. James was shot twice, the first bullet travelled 'superficially' from right to left across his body, the second bullet entered his back and travelled from right to left. Two eyewitnesses gave evidence to the Widgery Tribunal that Wray was shot and wounded and then was shot dead, from close range, while he lay on the ground. A number of people, who were not called to give evidence to the Widgery Inquiry, stated that Wray was complaining that he was unable to move his legs when he was shot a second time and killed.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.61 ... and that either Private G or Private H fired the first shot to hit Jim Wray." and "3.63 As we have said, Jim Wray was shot twice, the second time probably when he was lying mortally wounded on the ground. It is probable that either Private G or Private H fired this second shot." and "3.108 In our view none of these soldiers fired in the belief that he had or might have identified a person in possession of or using or about to use bombs or firearms. William McKinney and Jim Wray were both shot in the back and none of the other casualties (with the possible exception of Daniel Gillespie) appears to have been facing the soldiers when shot. We are sure that these soldiers fired either in the belief that no-one in the areas towards which they respectively fired was posing a threat of causing death or serious injury, or not caring whether or not anyone there was posing such a threat." BSI/V1/C3

Gerald Donaghey (17)
Gerald Donaghey was shot once in the abdomen, probably by Soldier G, but did not die at the scene. He was trying to run to safety between Glenfada Park and Abbey Park when he was shot. He was eventually taken to the house of Raymond Rogan in the hope of getting medical treatment for his wounds. In the house his clothes were searched for identification. Gerald Donaghey was examined in the house by Doctor Kevin Swords who had to open his clothing to carry out the examination. Dr Swords recommended that Gerald be taken to Altnagelvin Hospital. Raymond Rogan and Leo Young began the drive to the hospital with Gerald in Rogan's car. At a military checkpoint in Barrack Street both Rogan and Young were ordered to leave the vehicle and a soldier drove it to the Regimental Aid Post of 1st Battalion Royal Anglian Regiment where Soldier 138, a Medical Officer, pronounced that Gerald Donaghey was dead. Soldier 138 carried out a detailed examination of Donaghey's body shortly after.
None of those who were in contact with Donaghey after his shooting, including Soldier 138, noticed anything in his pockets. However, a police photograph taken shortly soon after showed a nailbomb in one of Donaghey's pockets. Soldier 127 then found a total of four nailbombs on Donaghey following a search of his clothes.
Lord Widgery rejected the suggestion that the bombs were planted on Donaghey by a member of the security forces: "No evidence was offered as to ... why Donaghey should have been singled out for this treatment." (Widgery Report, Paragraph 88 ). The fact that Donaghey was a member of Fianna Éireann, the youth wing of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), might have been the reason why he was "singled out".
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.110 Private G shot Gerard McKinney in Abbey Park. As we have already noted, his shot passed through this casualty and mortally wounded Gerald Donaghey. Private G may not have been aware that his shot had had this additional effect. Private G falsely denied that he had fired in Abbey Park. He did not fire in fear or panic and we are sure that he must have fired knowing that Gerard McKinney was not posing a threat of causing death or serious injury." and "3.111 Gerald Donaghey was taken by car to the Regimental Aid Post of 1st Battalion, The Royal Anglian Regiment, which was at the western end of Craigavon Bridge, which spans the River Foyle. There four nail bombs were found in his pockets. The question arose as to whether the nail bombs were in his pockets when he was shot, or had been planted on him later by the security forces. We have considered the substantial amount of evidence relating to this question and have concluded, for reasons that we give, that the nail bombs were probably on Gerald Donaghey when he was shot. However, we are sure that Gerald Donaghey was not preparing or attempting to throw a nail bomb when he was shot; and we are equally sure that he was not shot because of his possession of nail bombs. He was shot while trying to escape from the soldiers." BSI/V1/C3

Gerald McKinney (35)
Gerald McKinney was also shot dead in Glenfada Park. He had been part of the group of people who were caught in Glenfada Park and who were trying to get to safety towards Westland Street. He decided to make a run for it at the same time as Gerald Donaghey who was just ahead of him. Donaghey was shot and McKinney must have seen the soldier. Two eyewitnesses stated that McKinney then raised his arms in surrender and shouted, "Don't shoot!, Don't shoot!". The trajectory of the bullet through his chest from left to right is consistent with this evidence. Had McKinney's arms not been raised the bullet would have passed through one or both arms.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.64 There is no doubt that Private G was the soldier who at a range of only a few yards fired at and mortally wounded Gerard McKinney in Abbey Park. His shot passed through Gerard McKinney’s body and also mortally wounded Gerald Donaghey." and "3.73 ... In Abbey Park, Gerald Donaghey was hit and mortally wounded by the bullet that had first mortally wounded Gerard McKinney, but neither William McKinney nor Gerard McKinney was posing a threat of causing death or serious injury." and "3.110 ... Private G falsely denied that he had fired in Abbey Park. He did not fire in fear or panic and we are sure that he must have fired knowing that Gerard McKinney was not posing a threat of causing death or serious injury." BSI/V1/C3

William McKinney (26)
William McKinney was shot dead after he left the safety of cover to try to assist Gerald McKinney (not a relation) who had been shot moments before. He was shot from behind, as he was bent over Gerald McKinney, and the bullet travelled through his chest from right to left and then through his left wrist.
The Saville Inquiry concluded: "3.61 ... However, we consider it more likely than not that either Lance Corporal F or Private H fired the shot that mortally wounded William McKinney; ..." and "3.73 ... but neither William McKinney nor Gerard McKinney was posing a threat of causing death or serious injury." BSI/V1/C3

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